Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues – May 20, 2015

Happy Hump Day everyone! With the sad news in the Blues world recently, it’s important we celebrate the good times and the true meaning of the Blues, which is of course, Seduction. Sweet, sweet seduction. For a hundred years the blues singers have been seducing mates by boasting of their sexual prowess, directly and through metaphor. They sing of their experiences, what they knew and what they could do, for you, to you, and with you. However, Willie Dixon came along and made this power congenital. That sounds dirty. Yes, Willie (which also sounds dirty) wrote about being born a sexual dynamo. He was so powerful the gypsy woman showed up to warn his mother. I’m not sure what she hoped to accomplish with that. Maybe it was her recommendation to keep him away from the Little Schoolgirls. We’ll probably never know. One thing we do know is that singing about this natural born condition was contagious.

Pretty much everyone has sung this song, even the ladies. Etta James famously adapted the song as “Hoochie Coochie Gal.” Just in case you’re not sure, she’s gonna tell you what it’s all about. Now, since we’re a Blues website we’ll stick to mostly Blues artists but “Hoochie Coochie Man” has been done by rockers like Steppenwolf and the Rolling Stones and jazz masters like Jimmy Smith, to guys like Lou Rawls and Steven Seagal.

Don’t worry, Steven Seagal’s version didn’t make our list, but you might hate one of them just as much! See? You have something to look forward to. You should definitely look forward to a live rendition from Buddy Guy. He messes with the crowd and they deserve it too. Some of them wouldn’t shut up during the quiet intro. We’ve got Muddy Waters doing a version from a 70s TV special, Junior Wells’ studio recording, the man himself Mr. Willie Dixon performing with Stephen Stills, a smoking 1970 live version from The Allman Brothers Band, and Walter Trout laying waste to everything holy with a blazing five-alarm guitar fire.

Since the song made the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s list of the “500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll” we have to include at least one Rock & Roll version so we’re jumping way off the deep end where Lemmy is dressed in a leather and denim bathing suit and floating in a lounge chair with a Jack & Coke in one hand and a Marlboro in the other reminiscing about his legendary exploits. Yes folks, even Motorhead did a version of “Hoochie Coochie Man.” Don’t make assumptions! Give it a listen. It features the short lived early 80’s line-up with former Thin Lizzy guitarist Brian Robertson and is a pretty good Blues jam. Maybe it will seduce you into a life of Rock & Roll sin. Whatever you do, enjoy the rest of your week. Lemmy remind you, there’s still time to throw a Hump into it.

Etta James Hoochie Coochie Gal

Buddy Guy

Muddy Waters

Junior Wells

Willie Dixon with Stephen Stills

Allman Brothers Band

Walter Trout Band

Motorhead

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Jim Kanavy

Publisher at Blues Biscuits
I started writing about music professionally in 2008. Over the last 6 years I’ve been published in Hittin’ The Note magazine, American Blues News, Blues Blast, and American Blues Scene. I’ve met some wonderful people and I’ve heard a lot of music. I’ve written a lot of reviews. Some of the music is extraordinary, and some is not.I'm covering it all honestly and with integrity.
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