Category Archives: Hump Day

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 11/5/14

BluesBiscuitsHumpdayHump Day baby! Hump that bump! Bump that Booty. It’s Booty time, booty time across the USA! Like that classic Blues band the Spin Doctors once said “Gotta love it, it’s my duty, she got a big fat funky booty.” Tongue in cheek right? Right!

I don’t know how or why but this week is Booty week. Let’s blame Linsey Alexander who just put out a new disc called Come Back Baby (reviewed here) and he has a tune called “Booty Call” that’s catchy, naughty, and bawdy. The blues men have a long history of loving a big woman with a big back side. From Leadbelly’s “Big Fat Woman Blues” to Big Joe Turner’s “TV Mama” – the one with the big wide screen – the blues loves a booty. Whether they’re calling it, bumping it, humping it or just looking at up close and personal, they love it.

Freddie King was a fan of the shakin’ booty, and as you’ll see in the Bobby Rush video, so is he! There’s plenty of gratuitous booty shakin’ when Bobby Rush is on stage with Mizz Lowe and the other dancers. Watching Mizz Lowe work it might not be safe for work so keep it on the down low.

Last, we have Son Seals. Poor Son was so depressed by the skinny women in the big city he declared he was “Goin’ Home” where women got meat on their bones – and a big fat ass (we added that part but he was thinking it!). Somebody shoot thang! Happy Hump Day friends. Enjoy!

 

Linsey Alexander Booty Call

http://vimeo.com/105465132

Freddie King Shake Your Booty (Live)

Bobby Rush I Ain’t Studdin’ You (Live)

Son Seals Goin’ Home

 

 

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 10/29/14

BluesBiscuitsHumpdayHappy Hump Day folks. This week we’re looking at a song that has become a staple in Rock and Blues. “Good Morning Little School Girl” has been done by hundreds of artists over the years. It is possibly the most popular song every written about pedophilia. The song was first recorded by John Lee “Sonny Boy” Williamson in 1937 as “Good Morning, School Girl.” In true blues fashion the tune is borrowed and in this case, the melody is from Son Bonds’ “Back And Side Blues.” I couldn’t find a clip of it to share but you can find audio out there on Spotify and other retailers if you want to compare them.

The song has been done many different ways. Performers like Mississippi Fred McDowell, Lightnin’ Hopkins, and John Lee Hooker all did country blues versions. In 1965, Junior Wells and Buddy Guy recorded it for Hoodoo Man Blues giving it a distinctive guitar riff and bass line. That signature riff influenced nearly every future version of the song, especially in the Rock world. From The Yardbirds, Ten Years After, Johnny Winter, and ZZ Top, to the Allman Brothers Band and beyond, Buddy and Junior inspired an army of guitarists to whip out their big riffs and woo the school girls. It creeps me out.

As with many Blues songs, the more it’s covered the more it is changed. The words change a lot. the original were perhaps least creepy with only the first verse focusing on the underage object of his affection. Johnny Winter took the lechery to whole new levels with lines like “When I was twelve, baby when I was twelve years old – You know I was looking for a schoolgirl just to eat my jelly roll.” Alvin Lee from Ten Years After just wanted to ball you all night long, so at least you have that going for you. The only saving grace for this song is that in 1937 a lot of people got married well before the age of 18. And there’s that monster riff.

We present to you a few different versions for your amusement and/or horror.

John Lee “Sonny Boy” Williamson Good Morning, School Girl

Junior Wells’ Chicago Blues Band Good Morning Little School Girl

Buddy Guy Good Morning Little School Girl

Ten Years After Good Morning Little School Girl

Muddy Waters with Johnny Winter Good Morning Little School Girl

The Allman Brothers Band Good Morning Little School Girl

 

 

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 10/08/14

BluesBiscuitsHumpdayWelcome back for some Hump Day fun. I was in the mood for Lonnie Brooks this week and it led me to Lonnie’s “Wife For Tonight.” Now, Lonnie seems to be looking for loving so I’m hoping he didn’t end up with a Honey-do list, maxed-out credit cards, and dinner with the in-laws.

Thinking about Lonnie thinking about his nagging woman issues got me thinking about Buddy Guy’s version of “Someone Else Is Steppin’ In (Slippin’ Out, Slippin’ In).” It’s gone by other names but I like Buddy’s version the best. His facial expressions sell the song. The tune also serves as a warning to guys out there looking for a wife tonight. Maybe the wife you already have is looking for a husband for tonight. Maybe you should all go home and put things right.

Which brings us to Magic Slim & The Teardrops and “Shake It.” Maybe if you engaged your lover and got her shaking that thing you wouldn’t be out at night looking for another. Give it a try. Happy Hump Day everybody. Have some fun and shake it with the ones you love.

 

Lonnie Brooks Wife For Tonight

Buddy Guy Someone Else Is Steppin’ In (Slippin’ Out, Slippin’ In)

Magic Slim & The Teardrops Shake It

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 10/08/14

BluesBiscuitsHumpdayIt’s Hump Day again boys and girls and it’s time to get truckin’, if you know what I mean. If you’re not sure, these lewd, crude blues will surely get you into gear.

Ah, truckin’, the age old rhyming slang for its f-word counterpart – and I don’t mean fruckin’. Blind Boy Fuller referred to truckin’ in a few songs including “Truckin’ Little Baby” and “Truckin’ My Blues Away.” He liked to have some truckin’ fun! “Truckin’ My Blues Away” also gave rise to another song of his called “What’s That Smells Like Fish Mama” and you can all guess what it is. SPOILER ALERT! It rhymes with “sprunt.”

A few years after “Truckin’ Little Baby,” Big Bill Broonzy pulled a Led Zeppelin (or is it the other way around?) and came up with “Truckin’ Little Mama” albeit with somewhat different lyrics. Blind Boy Fuller’s influence reached far into the 20th Century and beyond. Hot Tuna regularly played a version of “Truckin’ My Blues Away” they called “Keep On Truckin’.” Blind Boy Fuller is widely credited as the originator of the phrase “keep on truckin'” so his reach is far beyond the musical realm. Nowadays, the term seems to mean “keep going” or “carry on” and the intercourse angle has been put to bed. It’s a truckin’ shame.

DavePhilAlvinCommonGroundBig Bill Broonzy has had a major influence on music of the 20th Century and beyond as well. He was a huge influence on Muddy Waters who in turn revolutionized Blues, Rock & Roll, and even popular music, of every era since. In early 80’s southern California the Alvin brothers put together a band called The Blasters which was greatly influenced by Big Bill Broonzy. Dave and Phil Alvin have rekindled their musical relationship and released a tribute to Big Bill Broonzy (our review of it can be found here). Today we have a video from their recent tour doing a truckin’ great version of “Truckin’ Little Woman.”

If all goes well you’ll find yourself a truckin’ little woman for Hump Day who hopefully doesn’t have anything that smells like fish. if you are a truckin’ little woman, keep your cabin clean and keep on truckin’. For our final entry (that sounds dirty) we have a tune I found that doesn’t really fit in except that Kokomo Arnold seems to be happy to engage a Sissy Man if he can’t find a lady. So, if you can’t find a truckin’ little woman, maybe try a sissy man. Good luck with all that…

Blind Boy Fuller She’s A Truckin’ Little Baby

Big Bill Broonzy Truckin’ Little Woman

Hot Tuna Keep On Truckin’

Dave Alvin and Phil Alvin Truckin’ Little Woman

Kokomo Arnold Sissy Man Blues

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 10/01/14

RoosterThere’s a famous story Mike Bloomfield used to tell about his natural confusion when he heard the Hoochie Coochie Man Muddy Waters proclaim his love for sucking cock. What young Mike didn’t realize was that the term “cock,” in early 20th Century southern black communities, referred to female genitalia. Mike was probably thinking of the what they called the “cock opener.” The term seems to have popped up from the verb “to cock,” which a lot of 17th Century English colonists used to refer to intercourse. As their slaves learned English, they of course learned the slang along with it. 150 years later, Muddy Waters is regaling his young white acolyte with tales of sucking cock. Thus we erect this week’s Hump Day installment. We dedicate the following blues licks to the ladies.

Louise Johnson was Charley Patton’s girlfriend and a barrelhouse pianist. At one point, Louise went with Charley, Son House, and Willie Brown to Grafton, Wisconsin to make records for Paramount. During those sessions, she cut her total recorded legacy: four sides. One of those four sides was a celebration of “cocking it on the wall” which was slang for sex against a wall outside a juke joint.

Her song “On The Wall” has this stanza:

Well, I’m goin’ to Memphis, stop at Church’s Hall
I’m gonna show you women how to cock it on the wall
I’m goin’ to Memphis, stop at Church’s Hall
I’m goin’ to show them womens, honey, how to cock it on a wall

Sometime in the mid 50’s, The Clovers, who brought you “Love Potion #9,” recorded a parody of Dixieland jazz standard “Darktown Strutters’ Ball.” They called their version “Rotten Cocksucker’s Ball.” We may never know if they meant it like Muddy, but it sure seems like it. I really hope they had a good time, they seemed to be looking forward to it.

Lastly, we have The Rolling Stones final kiss off to their record label Decca at a time the Stones wanted to start their own label. Decca was demanding a final song and the band was being bratty and indignant. The Stones turned in a low-key, mostly boring tune called “Cocksucker Blues.” Decca refused to release it and realized they weren’t getting a marketable song so they let the band go.

Hey, they got their name from a Muddy Waters tune and named a song after one of his favorite activities. It had to be included.

Louise Johnson On The Wall

The Clovers Rotten Cocksuckers’ Ball

The Rolling Stones Cocksucker Blues

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 9/17/14

VictoriaSpiveyTime’s running out on Hump Day but it’s not too late for some black snake moaning. Black snakes crawling, black snakes creeping, and crawling king snakes everywhere. The snake, the serpent, the biblical slithering source of sin – it turns up often in blues and it’s offering fruit from the tree of carnal knowledge. “Black Snake Blues” by Victoria Spivey is the first known recorded reference to the Black Snake metaphor. Victoria recorded the song in 1926 for Okeh. It is thought that Blind Lemon Jefferson wrote his “Black Snake Moan” in response to Spivey’s tune. Response songs were common in the early days of recorded music. If a song became popular, others tried to capitalize by recording an answer song. This is a trend that continues today, for instance, 50 Cent recorded “21 Questions” and then Lil’ Mo recorded “21 Answers.” Also, all throughout the history of blues, but especially in the early days, musicians would capitalize on the popularity of a song by re-writing in slightly and issuing it. So, once the Black Snake was unleashed it started turning up in dark places everywhere.

One of the most famous uses of the snake in blues is John Lee Hooker’s “Crawling King Snake.” The Hook recorded several versions and so have a myriad of other artists including The Doors. Jim Morrison was considered a major sex symbol in the late sixties and he knew how to supercharge the music with sexuality. He, and The Doors brought the danger, mystery, and sexuality of blues into their apocalyptic rock music.

So today we have Victoria Spivey’s tune that started it all, Jefferson’s answer song, The Hook rocking out with Foghat and Paul Butterfield as he asserts his dominance, and some rare footage of The Doors recording John Lee’s classic. Maybe next time we’ll feature David Coverdale singing about his Whitesnake. Maybe not…

Victoria Spivey Black Snake Blues

 

Blind Lemon Jefferson Black Snake Moan

 

John Lee Hooker Crawling King Snake

 

The Doors Crawling King Snake

 

WAIT…

 

 

FOR…

 

 

IT…

 

 

 

 

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 9/10/14

TennyTuckerI recently had the opportunity to attend one of Teeny Tucker’s “Women In The Blues” presentations and it was quite informative and entertaining. I had never heard of Alberta Hunter and Teeny showed a video of the rediscovered, 82 year old blues singer. She was spunky, slyly humorous, winked at the audience, and sang about how her castle’s always rockin’. Even at 82, you believed it was true. Then, over this past weekend I was listening to B.B. King’s Bluesville on Sirius/XM and who comes on but Alberta Hunter with another bawdy tune – “You Can’t Tell The Difference After Dark.” Always being on the lookout for Blues filth, I made a mental note. Fast forward to Hump Day. This is a great opportunity to introduce you to Alberta Hunter, if like me, you never heard of her. I also included a Teeny Tucker song at the end, however, it is not bawdy. I just wanted you to hear her too if you have not.

On the subject of Women Of The Blues, many people don’t realize Blues was very much a woman’s domain in the early days. Researchers looking for info on Charley Patton, Son House, Robert Johnson, and many other prominent males, have often found that the women were remembered by more people and in greater detail. Women were also recorded earlier. In fact, Mamie Smith’s “Crazy Blues” is widely regarded as the first blues recording and was made on August 10, 1920. So how does this relate to Hump Day? You may have noticed most of the risque tunes are sung by women. It’s not that the women were more sexually charged than men, although they may have been (wink wink nudge nudge), but the women were making more records in general. Maybe the men were just tired from shaking ashes, greasing griddles, chopping meat, and trimming the lawn, if you know what I mean…

 

Alberta Hunter You Can’t Tell The Difference After Dark

Alberta Hunter My Handy Man Live – 1981

Alberta Hunter Two-Fisted Double-Jointed Rough And Ready Man

And here’s a sample of Teeny Tucker, taken from her performance at Sun Studios for their Sessions series.

Teeny Tucker Keep the Blues Alive

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 9/3/14

JuniorKimbroughWelcome back to Hump Day. We skipped last week in honor of Stevie Ray Vaughan and a special post about his impact but we’re back this week. There’s not really a theme, but we have Junior Kimbrough wanting to try you, girl, and two ladies who have some advice for him if he wants to keep trying, if you know what I mean.

 

 

 

Junior Kimbrough “I Gotta Try You Girl”

Julia Lee “Don’t Come Too Soon”

Barbara Carr “Bone Me Like You Own Me”

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 8/20/14

It’s Hump Day and that means blues. Low down, dirty, grinding blues. I’ve read that the bigger the cushion, the sweeter the pushin’ and apparently a lot of blues musicians have heard the same thing. For decades, bluesmen have been chubby-chasing and lusting after big-legged women. Even Leadbelly sang about loving a big fat woman.

ChickWillisStoopDownChick Willis was famous for his risque song “Stoop Down Baby” and his ribald lyrics have permeated his work all throughout his career. The one we picked for Hump Day is “I Want A Big Fat Woman.” There’s no double-entendre there. It’s quite clear. Bring on the heavy weights and get it on!

 

bobcorritore_1According to his website, Bob Corritore is “considered among the top traditional blues harmonica players on the scene today. Additionally he is the owner of the Rhythm Room, the radio show host of “Those Lowdown Blues” on KJZZ, the founder of Southwest Musical Arts Foundation, the editor and main writer of the Bob Corritore Blues Newsletter, an official endorser of Hohner harmonicas, a Keeping The Blues Alive award recipient, a grammy nominated harmonica player and producer, an honorary member of Collectif Des Radios Blues, and a great fan of, and active participant in blues music in general.” And he also wants a big fat mama. 

BnoisKingSingsSmokin’ Joe Kubek & Bnois King have made our Hump Day list before with “My Space Or Yours.” Bnois has an eye for the ladies and he likes a healthy, healthy mama. Not surprisingly it comes from an album called “Roadhouse Research.” I’m betting Bnois wasn’t just sampling the menus and beer on tap.

 

 

 

Happy Hump Day Biscuiteers! Get movin’!

Chick Willis I Want A Big Fat Woman

Bob Corritore Big Fat Mama

Smokin’ Joe Kubek & Bnois King Healthy Mama

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 8/13/14

BuddyGuySlippinInHump day, hump day, hump day! Step right up folks, but keep quiet and low down. We’re waitin’ til your man is gone, sneaking around back, and making a special delivery. I’d say we’ll be your back door man but I wouldn’t want you to get the wrong idea, if you know what I mean.

This week the tunes aren’t as naughty as usual but the characters involved certainly are. What we have are some tunes about sneaking around, covering multiple perspectives. Poor Albert Collins wondering who ate the steak attached to bones left on the dirty dishes, Buddy Guy letting his woman know that her sneaking around back fired, and Mr. Rick Estrin realizing he’s just another conquest of a woman sneaking around on her fiancee during the Blues Cruise. Oh, how wicked the women are in the world of blues. They’re as fickle as can be. The whole lot of them are immoral tarts and we love them. And so does everyone else apparently…

 
Albert Collins – Too Many Dirty Dishes (Montreux 1992)

Buddy Guy – Someone Else Is Steppin’ In (Slippin’ In)

Rick Estrin & The Nightcats – (I Met Her On The) Blues Cruise