B.B. King Hospitalized Amid Charges Of Elder Abuse

The King of the Blues, B.B. King has been treated by doctors after his daughter Patty King charged the blues legend’s longtime manager with elder abuse. Patty lives with her 89-year-old father and told TMZ she became worried when her father’s urine turned orange, and also mentioned he hasn’t been eating. Laverne Toney, who has B.B.’s power of attorney, allegedly refused to take him to the hospital. Patty King subsequently called the police, who summoned paramedics. B.B. King was then treated at a local hospital, where his daughter said he suffered a minor heart attack. She is now pushing for authorities to step in and protect King.

This occurrence isn’t Patty King’s first complaint against Toney. TMZ reports that last November, Patty charged Toney with elder abuse and burglary, saying that the manager and her assistant have siphoned off as much as $30 million from B.B. King, while allegedly withholding medications during King’s tour, plus pilfering jewelry valued at $250,000. According to TMZ, Police investigated the claims but no charges were filed. Toney has not yet commented on the current allegations.

King was rushed also to the hospital in early April 2015 after suffering from dehydration. An erratic show a year ago, in April 2014, was attributed to a missed dose of diabetes medication. Dehydration was also blamed when a series of shows was postponed in the fall of 2014. The King of the Blues reluctantly canceled all of his remaining concerts last year.

We wish B.B. King a speedy recovery and we hope he is getting the care he deserves and requires. Keep him in your thoughts.

 

Fresh Biscuits! CD Reviews – May 1, 2015

We are back with our weekly CD reviews! There are a lot of Blues releases both out now and coming soon, and we will endeavor to cover a lot of ground in the coming weeks. This week we have five reviews for you. I hope you enjoy them and as always I hope you find something interesting for your ears!

 

JoeBonamassaMuddyWolfAtRedRocksJoe Bonamassa

Muddy Wolf At Red Rocks

J&R Adventures

Released on March 23, 2015

Joe Bonamassa gets a lot of crap from Blues fans and while I may poke fun at his image once in a while, I know he is a dyed in the wool fan of the music. His performances on his latest live album Muddy Wolf At Red Rocks confirms this. Joe put together a crack band that manages to walk the tightrope between classic Chess Blues and Joe’s 70’s Blues Rock tendencies. The band features a three piece horn section, Anton Fig on drums, Reese Wynans on keyboards, Mike Henderson on harmonica, Michael Rhodes on bass, and the incredible Kirk Fletcher as Joe’s guitar sparring partner. Joe also goes to great lengths to showcase Muddy Waters and Howlin Wolf in their own words and image with introductory videos of the legends. The band swings and swaggers through a diverse selection of Muddy Waters tunes on disc one. They eschew the obvious and go for “Tiger In Your Tank,” they whip up a frenzy on “Real Love,” and everybody digs in deep on “Stuff You Gotta Watch”. Kirk Fletcher is a tone master and he plays with a classic touch that adds depth to every song.

Disc two is dedicated to Howlin’ Wolf with a bunch of Bonamassa mainstays rounding out the 77 minutes of music. “How Many More Years” starts off with Howlin’ Wolf’s original track then Joe and the band fall seamlessly into place after a few bars. Kirk Fletcher and Joe Bonamassa rip it up, tossing licks back and forth like musical hot potatoes. “Shake For Me” has a swinging horn arrangement, “Spoonful” digs up blues by the shovel load, and “Killing Floor” is sharp and sassy. Across two discs, the band gets plenty of time to shine but they all share a central purpose which is bringing Bonamassa fans into the circle of Muddy and the Wolf. The live album is a rousing musical success so let’s hope Joe’s fans will follow him to 2120 South Michigan Avenue.

 

JimiHendrixYouCantUseMyNameJimi Hendrix/ Curtis Knight & The Squires

You Can’t Use My Name – The RSVP/PPX Sessions

Experience Hendrix

Released on March 24, 2015

In the mid-1960s Jimi Hendrix was a little known sideman, working with the Isley Brothers, Don Covay, Little Richard, and Curtis Knight & The Squires. Ed Chalpin was an entrepreneur and record producer. His business, PPX International, Inc., was built around recording cover versions of top US hits for foreign record companies who would overdub lyrics in other languages. Eventually Chalpin began to produce original material which led to him managing and producing Curtis Knight & The Squires. It was through Curtis Knight that Chalpin met Jimmy Hendrix. Chalpin signed Hendrix to a notorious three-year recording contract for $1.00 and a 1% royalty. Hendrix later said he thought he was signing a release to get paid for the sessions. He was way off. Dozens of authentic looking Hendrix records have been licensed from those sessions even after the infamous lawsuit was settled and the Band Of Gypsys LP was delivered as payment to Chalpin.

Sadly, album opener “How Would You Feel,” a song about civil rights, discrimination, and unrest in the streets is still relevant today, nearly 50 years later. There are some other decent vocal tracks on this set, however it’s the instrumentals that are most interesting. “No Such Animal” is an instrumental written by Hendrix with an intro reminiscent of Roy Orbison’s “Pretty Woman” but it quickly moves into a back breaking R&B groove. “Knock Yourself Out (Flying on Instruments)” is reminiscent of Booker T. & The MGs and “Station Break” provides a great look at Hendrix’ early rhythm guitar chops. “Hornet’s Nest” is a revved up, funky blues jam and Jimi’s solos have a wild streak he would later refine, focus, and ride to fame. Unfortunately the rest of the disc ranges from filler to outright garbage. “Simon Says” would be a stupid throwaway if not for Jimi’s chord comping behind the inane lyrics. You could probably still go without hearing it and never think twice about it. This disc is the first time this music has been presented in its original context and it serves the purpose of a historical document. The liner notes are extensive and go into great detail about Jimi’s trouble with Chalpin and PPX. Unfortunately it is a wonderful package with little compelling music to offer.

 

JimmyCarpenterWalkAwayJimmy Carpenter

Walk Away

VizzTone

Released on September 23, 2014

Saxophonist Jimmy Carpenter has been featured by Jimmy Thackery, Eric Lindell, Walter ‘Wolfman’ Washington, Honey Island Swamp Band, and others, and he is currently on tour as a member of Mike Zito & The Wheel. However, his new disc, Walk Away, is the first album to carry his name on the marquee. The band Jimmy put together for Walk Away includes John Gros on keyboards, Cassandra Faulconer on bass, John Fohl on guitar, and Wayne Maureau on drums. Guests include percussionist Michael Skinkus, vocalist Reba Russell, trumpeter Antonio Gambrell, and guitarists Anson Funderburgh and Mike Zito who appear on one track each. Walk Away has been sitting on my desk and in my iTunes app. I’ll listen to an album in iTunes and occasionally it will be followed by Walk Away. I’d listen to a little, then, a little more, and then the whole thing several times through. I eventually realized I really like it so I wanted to include in our reviews. I love it when a record sneaks up on you and slowly but surely invades your consciousness.

The songs run the gamut from roadhouse shuffles to swinging jazz and soulful ballads. “She’s Not You” is a poignant, reflective relationship song, while “Walk Away” is an amusing relationship song where Jimmy quips he wishes she’d leave him just so he can watch her walk away. He also enjoys following her up the steps. In case you’re not following along, he likes her ass. We like his sax, and he plays it mightily throughout Walk Away, especially in the jazzy “7th Street Shuffle.” Keyboardist John Gros gets to stretch his fingers on this one as does John Fohl on guitar. This tune has a terrific ensemble groove and gives everyone room to shine. “My Favorite Muse” sums up the loose theme running through the record which was clearly inspired by a woman. Everywhere he goes he hears songs that remind him of you. You’re his favorite muse. You may or may not be everyone’s favorite muse. Feel good about it! You inspired a slew of great tunes and terrific performances. Walk Away is a fun record. You can tell Jimmy Carpenter and his crew had a great time checking out their favorite Muse.

 

SlamAllenFeelTheseBluesSlam Allen

Feel These Blues

American Showplace Music

Released on April 14, 2015

Slam Allen comes from a musical family. For a while he played drums in the family band The Allen Brothers. He spent nine years singing and playing lead guitar with James Cotton. He has fronted his own bands over the years and has produced several albums. His latest is Feel These Blues and he is making it mission to make sure you do. Slam’s vocals are strong, smooth, charming, and warm. He can sing any style under the Blues Bigtop with authority and authenticity. His guitar playing is a fully operational arsenal of licks, riffs, and tones. He can go gritty as in the album opening shuffle “Feel These Blues” or clean and supple like he does in “Can’t Break Away From That Girl.” The latter is such a slab of classic Soul I had to check the liner notes to see who wrote it. It was Slam. Damn. He is good. Very good. Slam Allen musters a vintage sound without feeling dated. There is a timeless quality to the songs and the sound to the music that resonates across the years.

Feel These Blues benefits from a great band that includes Jeff Anderson on bass, Dan Fadel on drums and the inimitable John Ginty on keyboards. John Ginty is the Maestro. I’d listen to anything he played even with the Dixie Chicks. Ginty’s keyboard accents are all over this record and if you know anything about John know this: he’s not playing synthesizers. His B3 matches Slam Allen’s songs perfectly and in combination with Slam’s sweet guitar it’s an unbeatable combination. Slam Allen writes excellent songs, he sings them from his soul, plays his guts out on his guitar, and delivers on every promise his music makes. It’s these things that have me scratching my head over his choice to cover Prince’s “Purple Rain.” I don’t care for Prince but I’ve always liked that song. The whole soundtrack was pretty good was in fact. But it just doesn’t translate to the Blues idiom. To me it’s seven wasted minutes. I’d rather have more Slam Allen music – you can feel those Blues.

TheCashboxKingsHoldingCourtThe Cashbox Kings

Holding Court

Blind Pig

Released on April 28, 2015

 

The Cash Box Kings are like the Steely Dan of Blues in the sense there is a nucleus of harp master Joe Nosek and singer Oscar Wilson. The duo is the driving force and as long as they surround themselves with handpicked musicians who match their vision, it will always sound like The Cashbox Kings. Holding Court features many fine musicians including Mark Haines on drums, Joel Paterson and Billy Flynn on guitars, Beau Sample on bass, with a rotating cast including Kenny “Beedy Eyes” Smith, Gerry Hundt, Brad Ber, and Barrelhouse Chuck. And, man, these guys are good. If this was 1956, they’d be in cream of the crop. They’d be legendary by now. Alas we are in the early daze of the 21st Century and Blues isn’t as popular as it was in the post WWII era. There’s a copious amount of talk about keeping the blues alive, but The Cashbox Kings are out there doing it. Not just keeping it alive but keeping it vibrant. They do this by presenting the vintage sounds of the original Chicago Blues mixed with modern themes. They take the details seriously. Every element is in place and every note has purpose.

They mix a slew of below-the-radar covers with masterful originals. Compositions like “Cash Box Boogie” and “I Miss You Miss Anne” are on equal footing with John Lee Hooker’s “Hobo Blues” and Big Smokey Smothers’ “I Ain’t Gonna Be No Monkey Man.” Two originals really stand out to me and it’s because of the lyrical content more than anything else. “Gotta Move Out To The Suburbs” explores the plight of inner city citizens being over-run by crime. They can’t live in the neighborhoods of their youth because of fear and violence. The gang activity stretches beyond the inner city and has infested many suburbs too. It is a harsh reality that faces many metropolitan areas and really needs more attention. The other explores the plight of working musicians in the brave new world of digital music. All aspects are covered from streaming service royalties, with lines like “Downloads don’t pay me, not even half a cent” and “People think music on the net should be free, it might as well ‘cause they sure ain’t payin’ me” to jackasses at shows telling their buddies not to buy the CDs – “People standing in line, to buy my CD. One said don’t buy it, I will burn it for you free.” I have heard this conversation. What possesses these idiots? The one offering is bad enough but what about the one with his cash out to buy the CD? Did you dislike the show? You’re in line to buy a CD, so you must have liked it. Are you really going to listen to your buddy and pocket the 20 bucks, or worse, go spend it on $10 cups of beer while you complain about the high cost of music and high-five each other over keeping the Blues alive? Alright, end of rant. Just think about it. And buy a Cashbox Kings Holding Court CD. You won’t regret it.

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 4/29/15

JustALickOriginalHump Day is just two days away from May 1st. Temperatures in the Northeast are starting to feel like Spring and we’ll have many days in the 70s next week. Sooner than later it’s going to get hot and we’ll be looking for something to keep us cool.

If you’re feeling over-heated, ladies, you might want to call the “Ice Cream Man” and get a few licks, if you know what I mean. John Brim is your Ice Cream Man and he’d love to deliver anything you want. If you feel like spinning up some of your own ice cream, Roosevelt Sykes has some milk for your can. That sounds dirty. He may love your “Ice Cream Freezer” but he’s a wee bit particular when it comes to flavors. He leaves strawberry and vanilla to others and goes straight for the black walnut. You know you want him to taste your black walnut, don’t you? One thing you should know ladies, is that if these words are to be believed, it seems his ice cream melts a little too fast:

She say, ‘Now, daddy can you jus hold back and stick around? ‘
I’ll say, I b’lieve you spoke jus a little too late pretty mama
I gotta let that flavor come runnin’ down

He must really love to lick the black walnut though because the woman invites him back:

She said, ‘Now, you done uses my freezer
‘Look like you gettin’ ready to leave’
She said, ‘But you’re still welcome to my can
When you have more cream to freeze’

Since you can’t eat ice cream all the time, you need to keep it cold. As luck would have it, Whistling Bob Howe & Frankie Griggs have just what you need to put in your box. Hey! we’re talking about ice here, and they have the “Coldest Stuff In Town.” They will fill your icebox anytime you need it. And with all this ice cream you’ve been making, you will be a regular stop, especially on Hump Day! Thanks for tuning in and stay frosty my little Biscuiteers.

 

John Brim Ice Cream Man

Roosevelt Sykes Ice Cream Freezer

 

Whistlin’ Bob Howe & Frankie Griggs The Coldest Stuff in Town

 

Fresh Biscuits! New Releases For April 24, 2015

It’s another week closer to summer even though it felt like winter here in the Northeast. there was snow in the air yesterday, but it was raining in my heart. I want to find Jack Frost and put the Double-Eyed Whammy on that little son of a sea monster. If anything can warm our winter crushed hearts it a week with a ton of new releases.

The new releases this week range from vintage British Blues to modern blue-eyed soul. there’s Delta blues via Netherlands, Acoustic porch rockin’, and plenty more. I can’t wait to hear Debbie Davies’ new platter. I always look forward to her new music. The most tantalizing this week though is the John Mayall archival release which includes the founding members of Fleetwood Mac – Peter Green, John McVie, and Mick Fleetwood. remember when Fleetwood Mac was a blues band? Me either, it was before my time. But I have the records to prove it!  That great band grew out of the Bluesbreakers and now we have a great opportunity to hear how it all went down.

Have a great weekend and pick up some blues and roots new releases while you’re out there looking for Spring. To those readers having beautiful weather and plenty of warmth, we shall live vicariously through you so make sure you have some hot new blues for us to enjoy. Have a great weekend everyone!

John Mayall

John Mayall Live In ’67

Debbie Davies

Debbie Davies Love Spin

Tad Robinson

Tad Robinson Day Into Night

Nighthawks

Nighthawks Back Porch Party

Jimbo Mathus

Jimbo Mathus Blue Healer

James Harman

James Harman Bonetime

Carolyn Wonderland

Carolyn Wonderland Live Texas Trio

Gaye Adegbalola & Wild Rutz

Gaye Adegbalola & Wild Rutz Is It Still Good To Ya?

Deb Ryder

Deb Ryder Let It Rain

Hans Theessink & Terry Evans

Hans Theessink & Terry Evans True & Blue

Hump Day Is Tax Day!

It’s Hump Day Biscuiteers but this week it happens to fall on Tax Day. We’re dedicating this week’s edition to tax time blues.

Naturally we have some Hump Day related good humor in two of these songs. The Dixon Brothers speculated what might happen if the government put “Sales Tax On The Women” and Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson decries paying luxury tax on his dates with ladies. 

Here are a pair of stanzas from “Sales Tax On The Women”

“That’s the way it goes, Uncle Sam knows
He’s just torturin’ me and my pals
We would die with the blues without any shoes
If you put the sales tax on the gals

Well, I don’t mean any harm when I step out at night
Happy times with the ladies I’ve spent
Sales taxes on the kisses just wouldn’t be right
In my pockets I would never have a cent”

Vinson took the approach of comparing women to meat, which were apparently two luxuries he could not do without:

“No I don’t wanna bite, that meat’s too hot for me
No I don’t wanna bite, that meat’s too hot for me
I used to get it for two dollars, way back in nineteen fifty three

Well I went to see my baby, she said daddy just relax
I went to see my baby, she said daddy just relax
But that night when I was leavin’, I paid ten dollars luxury tax”

Something tells me his baby got the ten dollars and not his Uncle Sam.

We haven’t always paid income tax to the Federal Government. In 1913, Congress added federal income taxes to the constitution by passing the 16th Amendment. In 1862, Congress created the first income tax in order to pay for the Civil War. That law was repealed in 1872. In 1894, Congress created a flat income tax which was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. It was gone within a year. In the early days of the Blues, sales tax was also a new concept. The Great Depression spurred state governments to add sales taxes to bring in revenue. Two dozen states started collecting sales tax in the 1930s. “Sales Tax” by Mississippi Sheiks explores this new concept. At the beginning of the song, there’s a little dialogue which sets up the song. It may not be that clear on the recording so here it is:

‘Hey Walter, we need some cigarettes
Lets go ahead and get a pack’
‘Okay’

Storekeeper Spoken:
‘Hello boys, what can I do for you?’

‘I’ll have a pack of cigarettes’

‘Alright, here you are’

‘Be 3 cents more, though’

(both spoken)
‘What’s that for?’

‘Sales tax, haven’t you ever heard of sales tax?’

‘I sho’ haven’t’
‘What’s gonna happen next, man?’
‘You know they gotta law here they call ‘sale tax’.

‘Sale tax, what is that for?’

‘that’s 3 cent tax on ev’ra thing that’s sold
They say that’s the government rule’

‘The governments rule?’
‘Well, there’s a-lotsa things sold that the government
Knows anything about.’

‘An I’ll just sing a little song about these sales tax.’

We’d be remiss if we did a Tax Day feature without Robert Cray’s “1040 Blues” and we have a rare live version of Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble doing The Beatles’ “Taxman.” And when you’re done paying all those taxes, you just might end up like Albert Collins: “Broke.” Let’s all just hope they don’t put sales tax on the women!

JB Lenoir Tax Paying Blues

Mississippi Sheiks Sales Tax

Dixon Brothers Sales Tax On The Women

Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson Luxury Tax Blues

Robert Cray 1040 Blues

Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble Taxman

Albert Collins Broke

Fresh Biscuits! New Releases For April 14, 2015

Recently, the record industry decided to give new release day worldwide consistency and they went with Friday. So, sometime soon all new releases will be available and in your greedy little hands a few days earlier, or a few days later depending on your point of view. It hasn’t happened yet, so until then we’ll keep putting up our list of bluesy new releases on Tuesdays.

Tuesday April 14, 2015 brings us a mishmash of blues related releases. Slam Allen delivers a stellar album, Feel These Blues. Sherwood Fleming brings you Blues Blues Blues, and classic rocker Randy Bachman serves up some Heavy Blues. Somehow this reminds me of the joke wherein you add the words “in bed” to any fortune cookie fortune. Maybe we should add “blues” to every album title. Beth Hart’s new album can be Better Than Home Blues, and the probable Albert King bootleg out today will become the Dylanesque title The Purple Carriage St Charles, IL 02-02-74 Blues. By now you’ve probably figured out that having Blues in the title of your album irritates me a little. I can’t really pinpoint why. Maybe it’s cheesy marketing, maybe it’s a throwback to the 30s and race records where blues songs all had blues in the title so people knew what style they were getting. I don’t know. Just stop. I’ve got the Blues In The Title Of Your Album Blues.

Two reissue/archival new releases this week are of particular interest. Omnivore Recordings has remastered James Luther Dickinson’s Beale Street Saturday Night project. For more info on this interesting historical document click here. The other is Canned Heat with John Lee Hooker Carnegie Hall 1971. This one is available on both CD and limited edition green vinyl and features liner notes by Dave Thompson with a brand new interview with Canned Heat drummer Adolfo Fito de la Parra.

Slam Allen

Slam Allen Feel These Blues

Sherwood Fleming

Sherwood Fleming Blues Blues Blues

Canned Heat and John Lee Hooker

Canned Heat and John Lee Hooker Carnegie Hall 1971

Beth Hart

Beth Hart Better Than Home

Beale Street Saturday Night

James Luther Dickinson Beale Street Saturday Night

Bachman

Bachman Heavy Blues

Albert King

Albert King The Purple Carriage St Charles, IL 02-02-74

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 4/8/15

This week’s Hump Day installment is a throwback to last Wednesday which was April Fools Day. I was sick as a dog last week and in the midst of fighting a fever so I didn’t get to post it.

Anyway, we’re exploring all the fools in the land of Blues. Since it was Muddy Waters’ 102nd birthday recently and his son Mud Morganfield, along with Kim Wilson, made a great tribute record called For Pops, we have their version of “Still A Fool.” There may be two trains runnin’ but this fool doesn’t know which way to go. Is he cheating? Is she steppin’ out? We may never know, but I’m betting on both. Maybe they’re the two trains running in opposite directions from each other.

Next we have Son Seals. Every guy in the bar knows his woman is anything but faithful. Poor Son has been fooled and fooled again.eventually she’ll shoot him in the face. Too soon? Another Chicago blues man is being played the fool in Linsey Alexander’s “Too Old To Be A New Fool.” Chicago must be full of fickle women. All these fools are in Chicago getting the runaround from woman after woman. Even our last entry, from Mr. Buddy Guy, is a Chicago Blues legend but maybe he’s wising up and doing some fooling of his own. Who’s been foolin’ you baby?

So, as April fools us here in the Northeast into thinking it’s still winter, hopefully some April Fools Blues will warm you up, wherever you are. Don’t get fooled while you’re foolin’ around on Hump Day.

Mud Morganfield & Kim Wilson Still A Fool

Son Seals I Think You’re Fooling Me
https://youtu.be/l1NSj8sbPrg

Linsey Alexander Too Old To Be A New Fool

Buddy Guy Who’s Been Foolin’ You

Fresh Biscuits! New Releases From March 2015

March was a fairly quite month for new releases. Hopefully April will see more Blues music coming out as we head into festival season for 2015. What did arrive in March was fairly interesting though. Joe Bonamassa released a live tribute to Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf, Danielle Nicole (aka Danielle Schnebelen from Trampled Underfoot) put out an EP featuring her first solo recordings, and Ian Siegal delivered The Picnic Sessions featuring impromptu jams with Alvin Youngblood Hart, Cody Dickinson, Luther Dickinson, and Jimbo Mathus.

Other artists who had new releases in March include Innes Sibun, Papaslide, Robben Ford, Doug MacLeod, JJ Grey & Mofro, and James Day & The Fish Fry. If you’re an artist and you put out a new album recently or you have one coming out soon, let us know and we’ll be sure to include you in our round up!

As always, we try to keep you up to date on the new releases, even if there aren’t many on a weekly basis. Once the new releases start rolling in we’ll be back to our weekly schedule instead of these monthly updates.

Innes Sibun

Innes Sibun Blues Transfusion

Papaslide

Papaslide The Deepest Pain

Joe Bonamassa

Joe Bonamassa Muddy Wolf at Red Rocks

Robben Ford

Robben Ford Into the Sun

Danielle Nicole

Danielle Nicole Danielle Nicole EP

Doug MacLeod

Doug MacLeod Exactly Like This

Ian Siegal

Ian Siegal The Picnic Sessions

JJ Grey & Mofro

JJ Grey & Mofro Ol’ Glory

James Day & The Fish Fry

James Day & The Fish Fry Southland

Hump Day! Risque Tunes For Your Midweek Blues 3/25/15

Hump Day this week is brought to you by Muddy & The Wolf. Inspiration came in the form of Joe Bonamassa’s new live album Muddy Wolf At Red Rocks. Joe Bonamassa seems to inspire extreme feelings on both ends of the spectrum in the world of Blues fans. But love him or hate him, we should be happy he’s introducing his fans to the legends of Blues. If he steers just one kid away from Justin Bieber we can call it a win! It’s always a good thing when people acknowledge their influences and shine a light on their artistry.

This week, like Mr. Bonamassa, we celebrate the artistry, wit, humor, and machismo of the late greats Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. Since we’re shining a light, I tried to steer off the main drag onto the seedy side streets of their catalogs. Of the two, I’d say Muddy was the more prolific womanizer in both song and real life. He loved the ladies and the ladies loved their Hoochie Coochie Man right back, especially when he got his Mojo Workin’. For Hump Day, Muddy is singing a warning to those Big Legged Women out there. Don’t be showing off the goods if you don’t want the attention ladies. It’s a public service announcement. Yeah, that sounds about right. In fact, Muddy cares so much about your well being he has become your doctor. He’s a got a powerful prescription and he’d like you to take it as often as possible. He’ll fill it for you any time you call. That sounds dirty.

Now, Howlin’ Wolf, on the other hand, was not as much of a ladies man as Muddy. He may have been your Back Door Man, but he was on your Evil ways of doggin’ him around. Where Muddy professed his powers of seduction, Howlin’ Wolf was keenly aware of the power of women. He took a skeptical view of their feminine wiles and their manipulations. For Hump Day, Wolf is singing about his Country Sugar Mama. She’s got sweet, sweet sugar and he needs it three times a day, but he wants to know where she got sugar that good. Her sugar is the best in town and everybody knows it, and everybody wants it. Wolf knows it’s too good for her to be true to him or anyone else and he’s got questions. Howlin’ Wolf was a thinker and often this part of his personality came into his songs. He’s definitely been thinking about where you were last night, spread out all over town doing the All Night Boogie. He knows exactly what you’ve been up to. You’ve been celebrating Hump Day all week long!

 

Muddy Waters Big Legged Woman

Muddy Waters I’m Your Doctor

Howlin’ Wolf My Country Sugar Mama

Howlin’ Wolf All Night Boogie

Here’s a little Hump Day bonus:

Joe Bonamassa You Shook Me from Muddy Wolf At Red Rocks

Check out Joe’s new album at music retailers everywhere.

Flashback Friday! Happy Birthday To Jimmie Vaughan

JimmieVaughanLincolnCenter7Hey everybody, we haven’t done a Flashback Friday feature before but this Friday happens to be Jimmie Vaughan’s birthday. I thought it would be a great time to revisit a tremendous show Jimmie and his friends put on at Lincoln Center back in 2011. Billed as the Texas Blues Summit, the show featured Lou Ann Barton, W.C. Clark, and Billy Gibbons. A fun time was had by all and the talent was bigger than the republic of Texas itself!

 

Here we go folks, way way back to 2011…

 

TEXAS BLUES SUMMIT

When Jazz At Lincoln Center was planning it’s second annual Blues Summit, legendary guitarist and performer Jimmie Vaughan was chosen bring together a night of Texas Blues. A better choice would be hard to find. Jimmie Vaughan has been a fixture of the Texas blues scene for nearly 40 years. One of his first bands opened for Jimi Hendrix. In the mid-70’s he founded the Fabulous Thunderbirds, a band considered by many to be the most important white blues band of all time. The band became a fixture at the seminal Austin club Antone’s and backed up major figures of the blues like Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy, Albert King, Gatemouth Brown, Albert Collins and countless others. Jimmie learned the blues from the masters and earned their respect in return. Since those days at Antone’s, Jimmie Vaughan has accumulated many devoted fans including some famous ones like Eric Clapton, Bonnie Raitt and B.B. King. Even Jimmie’s little brother Stevie Ray Vaughan often cited Jimmie as his favorite guitarist and biggest influence.

JimmieVaughanLincolnCenter5BnWJimmie Vaughan has experienced the blues in ways many can only imagine, not the least of which is the death of his younger brother in 1990 after a night of glorious music. He brought all his life experiences and musical influences to the stage of Jazz At Lincoln Center’s Rose Hall Theater on Thursday, June 16, 2011. He also brought some famous friends.

Lou Ann Barton has been a fixture of the Texas Blues scene for almost as long as Jimmie Vaughan. Her inimitable style, laced with a bit of Texas twang is still formidably robust and she wails the blues with the power of a singer half her age.

100_5142

Austin native W.C. Clark has been called the Godfather of Austin Blues and has been involved in the city’s music since the late sixties. He originally left Austin. Believing the R&B music scene was dead, he hit the road with the Joe Tex Band. A chance meeting with Jimmie Vaughan and Paul Ray changed his mind. A few weeks later he was back in Austin and has remained ever since. He has served as a mentor to both Vaughan brothers, taught Charlie and Will Sexton how to play guitar, backed up superstars like B.B. and Albert King, played in Triple Threat Revue with Stevie Ray Vaughan and Lou Ann Barton, co-wrote “Cold Shot” – one of Stevie’s biggest hits – and toured the world with his own band.

JimmieVaughanLincolnCenterBillyGibbonsThe Rev. Billy F. Gibbons is familiar to millions as the guitarist and singer from that little old band from Texas: ZZ Top. Billy and Jimmie have been friends since the early 70’s, sharing many experiences of the Texas music scene over the course of the last 40 years. All three musicians joined Jimmie Vaughan and his Tilt-A-Whirl Band for a salute to Texas Blues.

The night started off with upbeat instrumental “Comin’ And Goin’” from Vaughan’s recent Plays Blues, Ballads and Favorites album. It was a great way for the band to pick up a groove and each soloist got their moment in the spotlight, hinting at the level of musicianship and imagination that was to be heard over the next two-plus hours.

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The band, which features tenor saxophonist Greg Piccolo, baritone saxophonist Doug James, guitarist Billy Pitman, bassist Ronnie James, and drummer George Rains launched into Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown’s classic “Dirty Work At The Crossroads” and continued the nod to their regional partners in Louisiana with Guitar Junior’s (aka Lonnie Brooks) tune “Roll Roll Roll” which Jimmie Vaughan covered on Plays Blues Ballads And Favorites. Vaughan’s mastery of these songs is a heartfelt tribute to his influences and the music of his youth and is a testament to his talent and love of the idiom.

JimmieVaughanLincolnCenterWCClarkJimmie Vaughan is a formidable guitarist and appreciation of his technique and approach to the instrument is greatly enhanced by seeing him live. His fingers work magic as they weave their way around the neck of his variably capoed guitar. His use of open strings, drone notes, and percussive picking attacks all add exponentially to the flavor of his musical gumbo. The guitar jams were a highlight of the show and W.C. Clark came out for a few songs before the end of the first set and kicked things up a notch as he tore through some down home blues and even threw in a vocal tribute to Little Milton with a few snippets of “Blues Is Alright.” W.C. Clark feels at home on the stage and became the de facto band leader almost as soon as he plugged in his guitar. Jimmie shared a story about his first gig with W.C. Clark being held at a converted funeral home. Their mutual admiration is obvious and during some extended jamming, they converse with their guitars like the old friends they are.

JimmieVaughanLouAnnBartonLincolnCenter8BnWLou Ann Barton joined the band at the start of set two. The Texas Blues Summit found the Queen of Austin in fine form as she belted it out gloriously. The Rev. Billy F. Gibbons joined the fray and together with Jimmie Vaughan and The Tilt-A-Whirl Band he barnstormed through two Night Caps tunes, “Thunderbird” and “Wine, Wine, Wine”. Gibbons joked about he and Jimmie having written “At The High School Dance” back in 1962. Billy was having fun and kept begging for Jimmie to play more and then feigned fanning the smoke coming from Vaughan’s guitar.

JimmieVaughanLincolnCenter2The most poignant moment of the evening came when the band left Jimmie Vaughan alone on stage as he performed a stirring tribute to his brother. Jimmie plucked the rhythm with his thumb and the melody with his fingers in a swampy, reverb drenched rendition of “Six Strings Down” from his Strange Pleasure album. The arrangement conjured apparitions from the ether and angels from the heavens as he belted out his salute to Stevie Ray and a host of other Blues Stringers including fellow Texans Freddie King, Albert Collins, Lil’ Son Jackson, and T-Bone Walker to a mesmerized crowd.

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After more songs with Lou Ann Barton including a few from their upcoming Plays More Blues Ballads And Favorites, Billy Gibbons and W.C. Clark came out for a revved up version of “DF/W” from the Family Style album. The three guitarists let loose the blues in New York City and they’re probably still running amuck in the Upper West Side. The spirit of the Texas Blues cannot be confined, reigned in or broken. Jimmie Vaughan, the Tilt-A-Whirl band and their guests were a perfect choice to showcase the history and vitality of the music that has influenced generations of musicians and listeners alike.